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January 2016 Archives

Lack of protein may help identify aggressive colon cancer cases

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that doctors could use the lack of a protein called CDX2 to identify cases of aggressive colon cancer. The tumor in patients who have undergone surgical removal for stage 2 of colon cancer may return if it does not produce the protein, according to the findings. This could be a beneficial indicator for Ohio patients who are suffering from the disease.

Quality nurses could help save Ohio patients

According to an study published in JAMA Surgery, patients generally have better outcomes after surgery when their nurses have better work environments. Overall, there are fewer patient deaths after surgery in places with high quality nursing departments, and fewer patients died as a result of a complication related to a surgical procedure.

Medication errors behind one-third of poison center calls

According to a study, the vast majority of calls to poison centers for infants of the age of 6 months and younger were related to unintentional poisoning. Further, more than one-third of the poisonings involved medication errors. The study, which might be of interest to Ohio parents, was published in the journal Pediatrics in January 2016.

Burn injury victims and physical pain treatment

Ohio victims of burn injuries should be aware of findings that approximately 33,000 individuals obtain a burn injury each year while undergoing hospital emergency room care in the southern region of New Jersey and southeastern Pennsylvania and Delaware. One of the major effects of a burn injury is physical pain and discomfort. The degree of the burn determines how long the pain lasts, with some cases continuing for the victim's entire life.

Not all pediatric heart surgery hospitals are equal

After a series of botched operations forced the closing of a Florida hospital's pediatric heart surgery program, health care advocates are calling for the shut down of all poor-performing pediatric heart surgery programs across the U.S. and for parents to be informed of hospital success rates before surgeries are performed. As it is now, parents in Ohio and nationwide usually have no way of knowing which hospitals have a good record in pediatric heart surgery and which ones have a significant history of patient injuries and deaths.

Safety plays a critical role in improving surgical outcomes

Surgical teams in Ohio need outside support to make improvements in surgical safety. That was the conclusion of a research assistant commenting on patient safety research published by a team from Oxford University. She said that health care staff members do not have time to develop comprehensive improvements to surgical procedures and patient care. They need the insights of experts based on qualitative research.

Dangers of a minor head bump

While Ohio sports activities can pose a danger for head trauma to participants, there are many other ways in which an individual could suffer a brain injury. In fact, studies suggest that numerous individuals are affected by such issues annually. However, a brain injury can go unnoticed until serious symptoms become evident, especially in cases involving individuals who are older than 60.

Winter driving and the danger of light snow

Ohio residents may easily recognize the need for caution during instances of heavy snow, but light snow may actually be more of a hazard on the roads. Statistics gathered by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration between 2004 and 2013 show that weather was the cause of approximately 25 percent of car accidents during that time period. Of these, 44 percent resulted from winter-related issues such as sleet, snow, and ice conditions.

Calming driving habits for a safer year on the road

The amount of time a motorist spends on Ohio roads can impact a variety of personal issues, including safety, insurance rates, and health. Statistics indicate that the average American motorist drives nearly 13,500 miles per year. These numbers vary based on age and gender, and those in the prime of their professional and family lives log the most miles annually, more than 15,000. While the time on the road may be unavoidable, there are some changes that can be made to improve one's state of mind and to minimize the risk of accidents.

How hospitals declare brain death

According to a study published in JAMA Neurology, many U.S. hospitals are not following American Academy of Neurology Practice Parameters to determine brain death. While the study does note that hospitals are coming closer into alignment with the guidelines, Ohio residents should know that there is not 100 percent compliance. The parameters were created to reduce the possibility of a misdiagnosis. For the study, researchers examined 492 hospitals and their policies related to declaring brain death between July 2012 and July 2015.

How to avoid medication errors

Ohio nurses can reduce their chances of making a medication error by following certain guidelines. One of those guidelines is the five rights. This means making sure that right patient is getting the right medicine in the right dosage at the right time using the right method of administration.

New findings on TBI causes

Ohio personal injury accident victims may want to be aware of new findings that contribute to the understanding of traumatic brain injuries. While the exact mechanics of TBIs remain unknown, scientists continue to attempt to find out in an effort to prevent such long-lasting injuries from occurring. One team of researchers believes that pressure waves caused by traumatic events, such as explosions, create small bubbles in the brain. These bubbles may lead to the type of damage that results in a TBI.

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